I wonder how many people still remember those fun fair organs that the carnies used to play back in the 1900s? 

One such fairground organ, that started out life in an Antwerp dance hall in 1905, has now been programmed to perform this hypnotic rendition of the Queen classic, "Bohemian Rhapsody."

The traditional old sounds of this pipe organ put an antiquated spin on this pop classic. 

And lucky for us, these captivating sights and sounds have been captured on video!

The Marenghi 81 Key Dance Organ also has 350 pipes, and in the video we're shown how a strip of card, punctured with musical data and registration controls is fed through the organ. 

Built in 1905, this organ takes in the data and belts out the tune in its own exceptional and unique way, all while spitting the book of music out the other side.

You're going to be amazed at how spectacular it still sounds, even after all these years. 

Watch and listen:


This Marenghi 81 Key Dance Organ was built in 1905, and is ornately decorated with quite a few portraits

The videographer has captured the intricately decorated organ, complete with a number of portraits, as it performs the song in its entirety. 

In order for a fairground organ to be heard over the roar of crowds in public places, they were specifically designed to be very loud.

The organs were built to produce the popular music of that time period and were designed to imitate a human band.

Originally, these organs were used to go along with the many fairground rides and attractions.


In order for a fairground organ to be heard over the roar of crowds in public places, they were specifically designed to be very loud



We're shown how the organ is fed a strip of card punctured with the musical data and registration controls


The organs were built to produce the popular music of that time period and were designed to imitate a human band

The front or face of the organs - like the one in the video - often comes with various other instruments like a glockenspiel, which is similar to a xylophone, or drums to provide for more visual entertainment.

They're also designed so that they can be operated without a human performer and because of this they are often keyboard-less.

What do you think about this amazing piece of equipment? Have you ever been fortunate enough to see or hear one of these organs playing in reality?

Let us know in the comments and please don't forget to 'SHARE' this incredible video with family and friends on Facebook!